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Finzels Reach, Bristol

The development is a mixed use development on the site of the former courage brewery at a value of in excess of £200 million. It is a prime example of the redevelopment of a former industrial site to high quality housing and commercial spaces within the city centre.

The scheme comprises of 437 Apartments over six buildings, two office buildings (Bridgewater House and the Aurora Building), a Premier Inn, commercial leisure spaces,  and a micro brewery space.

The whole development comprises of both new build and retained building structures which without careful detailing can adversely affect the acoustic performance.

As part of our appointment we have advised on noise related planning conditions (such as the assessment of Internal Ambient Noise Levels to BS8233 and the noise from the Bridge), BREEAM advice, Approved Document ‘E’ (and Eco Homes) detailed design advice for building regulations and also post construction sound testing.

We were originally appointed to work on the Castle Wharf, Hop Store, Malt House, and Bridgwater House elements of the scheme with Sisk and Sons.

After a stall in the development we were successful in our bids and have recently completed advising and testing Bray and Slaughter for the detailed design advise for the Cask Store for both planning and Approved Document ‘E’.

We are also pleased to say we will be continuing our detailed design advice work on this scheme with Willmott Dixon for both the George’s Wharf element and Hawkins Lane apartments blocks built specifically for the private rental market.

Being a refurbishment this has presented a number of noise and acoustic challenges. Using our 30 years of experience, in house proprietary software and 3D modelling software, we have been advising the numerous clients and the architect on the key noise and acoustic issues.

We have helped the architect develop the proposals of all buildings from the early stage and advised on best practice measures to reduce the need for acoustic mitigation measures later on. We are pleased to say that to date no element has failed to achieve the required performance standards.